Monday, April 6, 2015

My Audiobook Journey - The Audition

Part 3
Click here for Part 1, Getting Started
Click here for Part 2, Finding My Producer

As you go into the production of your audiobook, you may end up with a lot of people auditioning to do your book. Some of them are very experienced. Others ... not so much. As you listen to those auditions, ask yourself some questions.

1. Does it sound professionally done? In other words, are you hearing other sounds that shouldn't be there? Does the reader take a lot of breaths or swallow but not edit them out? Is that even an issue for you? Just so you know, they can be edited out if they bother you.

2. Does the producer's voice match what you think your character(s) sound like? If not, is it a problem? Sometimes, a producer can add depth that you didn't imagine when you wrote the characters, so it's not a bad thing. Necessarily. Be open and flexible. Your readers, when looking at an ebook or paper copy, won't necessarily be reading it the way you hear it in your head either. But, would you want to listen to the book read this way? If not, that's a concern. Communication with your narrator is key here.

3. Does your narrator "get" you characters? This is important. How dialogue is read can change the entire meaning of a scene. For example, is the character angry vs frustrated as the narrator reads some dialogue? Does that scene lead to action that, if read incorrectly, won't make sense later?

4. How quick is your producer in responding to your questions, concerns, suggestions? Just like on the dating scene, if you don't like the way your producer "treats you," be wary. If you have concerns about the narrator's attitude or responsiveness, don't assume it will get better later on. Remember, you're being courted for a job. Applicants should be trying to impress you. If they aren't trying now, don't assume they will later.

I had one advantage. I'd already heard and knew I liked my producer's finished product. I'd heard good things about working with him from that book's author. He let me know right up front that he had other commitments and if I was in a hurry to get the book out, I might want to look for another narrator.

So, this is another question you might want to ask yourself: how quickly do you want your book finished? I was willing to wait.

There are things you can do to help the narrator "get" your characters. I'll talk about that next week.

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What am I reading (listening to)?

As the title says, it's an Alzheimer's love story. What do I think? It's a poignant story and takes the reader through the Alzheimer's journey. It's a touching and frightening story and is driving home what this terrible disease steals from its victims and their families.





Did you have a nice weekend? Do anything fun? 

We got a new grandson on April 1st and got to watch his big sister for a few days.

23 comments:

  1. Good point. If they have an attitude now, it won't get better later on.
    Glad you got to work with someone of quality!

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  2. Glad you already had an idea of who you wanted before you started getting this going. Glad it worked out so well for you.

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    1. Me too. It helped me a lot. I've been talking with others who have been going through lots of different auditions and struggling with the decision.

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  3. Good when you can hear a finished product and yeah, having little noises in the background is no good

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    1. It does help that a producer has a variety of works to review.

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  4. hooray for the new grandson!

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  5. Getting the narrator to match the sound of the MC is big part.

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    1. Huge part! One of my favorite books has a guy doing one of my favorite characters like Ted from Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventure. Dreadful! And in another book, they have a 50 year old guy (who sounds like he's 50 and talks like he's 50) doing a 15 year old kid. Dreadful again!

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  6. Very interesting stuff, Donna. Keep it coming!

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  7. I took a class at conference on making audio books. It was a real eye opener. It seems it's both easier and harder than I thought at first. There are more investments than I can make right now, plus you apparently need more room than I've got, but it seems like it would pay off. Have you ever thought about doing the audio yourself? In all your copious spare time? :o)
    Hey, I love the new look of your blog. Very cute.

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    1. Oh, I'd love to have attended that class. I'm actually working on the audiobook for Hope's Watch.

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  8. Such a lot to consider. I admire you for taking the challenge. I love audio books.

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    1. Me, too, Renae! And so worth having my own books in audiobook since I'm such a huge fan of them.

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  9. Congrats on the birth of your grandson.

    Blue Hydrangeas looks like an interesting read.

    It's been great reading your audiobook journey.

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    1. Blue Hydrangeas is kind of heartbreaking while also a sweet love story.

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  10. I know you listen to audiobooks a lot. Do you think that made the process of choosing a narrator easier or harder with your expert ears?

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    1. In a lot of ways, I think it made it easier because I already know what I like or don't like. It made it easier for me to communicate those to my narrator. It must be tough on them if they don't get clear instructions from the author. Kind of like going to the hair stylist. You know you want something different but not really much more than that. Somehow they're supposed to read your mind? When your mind isn't even clear on it? lol

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  11. Good points. This would be hard for me because I don't listen to audiobooks. I like reading, but I know so many people who love them.

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