Monday, January 13, 2014

Indie Publishing and Quitting

Some interesting articles today.

Author Natalie Whipple wrote an charming "apology" blog to indie authors here.
You're probably thinking these apologies have everything to do with the fact that I am working to self-publish a novel right now—you would be entirely correct and I'm okay with admitting that. Sometimes you have to step into the same shoes to really get it, and I can assure you I'm beginning to see both sides so much more clearly. 
The judging, I can already see it happening to me. I admit I thought because of my traditionally published books that I would be spared a little, but I'm starting to understand that is not the case. It's been a big lesson to me. A humbling one.
She says more--good stuff and I suggest you read her entire post--and she hits the nail on the head. I've been traditionally published and, now that my publisher has closed their doors, I'm branching off on my own. It carries a lot more pressure.

Source: PowerPoint
On another note, Author Kristen Lamb wrote an entertaining blog post: Want More Writing Success? Learn to be a QUITTER.
Learn to Quit from the Best
Most of us are lousy at knowing how and when to quit. This is one of the reasons it is a good idea to surround ourselves with successful people, because successful people are expert quitters. When I started out, I had all the wrong mentors. I had writer pals who quit writing when it was boring or who quit querying after a handful of rejections. They quit attending critique because they got their feelings hurt when people didn't rave their book was the best thing since kitten calendars. 
All this wrong kind of quitting is easy to fall into. Excuses are free, but they cost us everything.
 and later...
Artists Actually Need More Quitting
Quit your day job. Today. This moment. Now, by quitting, I don’t mean you should throw your laptop in a waste can and take a bat to that copy machine that’s eaten every presentation you’ve tried to photocopy since the day you were hired….though that might be fun.
No, I mean mentally QUIT, then hire yourself to the dream. Screw aspiring. Aspiring is for pansies. It takes guts to be a writer. It takes guts to be any kind of creative professional. Hire yourself to the job you dream about. TODAY.
She gives some great, specific examples of quitting. They weren't what I expected but made perfect sense. Check them out.

Are you a quitter? Of the right things? What are those things for you?

41 comments:

  1. I don't know about quitter, but I do know when to say no.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. If you read some of the things she mentions, Alex, you might find you've been a quitter too, once in a while. ;)

      Delete
  2. The idea of expert quitters is quite interesting. I've never thought of it that way, but there's a lot of truth to this idea. I guess the sticking point is to never stop quitting. ;) Great post, Donna.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I know, right? I'm totally a quitter in a lot of the things she mentions, so that article was a nice reinforcement of those decisions.

      Delete
  3. LOL I first read that as learn to be a quilter.

    I read not long ago that calling yourself an aspiring author means you haven't written anything yet. You just want to write a book. As soon as you start writing that book, then you're a writer.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Too funny! Yeah, she addresses the aspiring author issue in the post. She's even a little bossy about it. But that's okay. Sometimes we need a strong nudge.

      Delete
  4. I can confirm that it takes guts to be a creative professional :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes, you would know that. It's hard to put ourselves out there.

      Delete
  5. I mentally quit all other jobs a long time ago. Just ask my son who knows when I say, "I'm getting ready to query again," means he's on frozen dinners for the next six months. Ha!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hopefully he's understanding and supportive about that.

      Delete
  6. I'm with L.G. I mentally quit my day job about a year ago. I'm still here and get the work done, but its to earn the paycheck that keeps the electricity on so I can write when I get home. Though I'm not sure I agree with using the word quitter. Its more of a reassessment of goals and realizing what works, what doesn't, and what hinders you from achieving that goal. I've learned A LOT about that in the last year. There's constant adjustment, I don't see myself as 'quitting' something so much as assessing their worth toward either my writing career or my marriage/life. Good post, Donna!

    Melanie

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well, I quit playing Castle Age on FB because it was taking too much time away from writing. I quit watching most TV because it was taking too much time from my writing. :D

      Delete
  7. Yeah there is pressure, oh I've quit my job long ago, if it wasn't for the paycheck I'd be long gone physically too. But I'd really like to take a bat to the postage machine lol

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Same here, Pat. If it wasn't for the need for health insurance, I'd be tempted to move to Hawaii with my daughter--which she keeps asking us to do--and just write.

      Delete
  8. Thanks for allowing us to rethink "quitting." It is easy to invest time on the wrong path--nothing wrong with a reset when that is required to achieve.

    Good stuff Donna.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yeah, I like things that make me think and reevaluate.

      Delete
  9. I am planning on a career change to a less stressful job when I get laid off so I can focus more on my writing. Hopefully that's what Kristen is talking about.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think that would certainly qualify, along with the kinds of things I mentioned in my comment to Melanie.

      Delete
  10. I need to go read that post! I've seen it around, but haven't clicked on it. I will now! :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I assume you're talking about Natalie's post since I've seen it on FB. You should read it.

      Delete
  11. Interesting. I quit aspiring back in 2012 and haven't regretted that decision since. It's been a long, arduous journey, and the road is actually only beginning. But I'm glad to be the kind of quitter of the things worth quitting so I can be a doer.

    I'll have to check out Natalie's apology post. Of course I wish her the best in whatever she endeavors to do and I wish you the best, Donna :-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I love the way you phrase that: quitter of things worth quitting.

      Delete
  12. Those both sound like fabulous posts. Off to read them both in their entirety.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I think you'll enjoy them. Well worth the time.

      Delete
  13. One of my favorite expressions has long been: The coyote who runs lives longer than the wolf who stays to fight. Yes, yes, there are times when one has to quit, perhaps re-evaluate the situation, then return another day. I don't think it should matter that you were traditionally published then entered the indie world, regardless of why. . . umm, back to my fav expression.

    ReplyDelete
  14. I quit 50% of my social media, because it was toxic. :)

    ReplyDelete
  15. If I quit my day job, who will pay my kids' school fees? The mortgage? Food?

    Goals have to be realistic.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. In the post, she talked about mentally quitting the day job and hiring yourself for the writing gig. I read that as a call to arms, as such, to take our writing more seriously.  I'm in the same situation as you as far as the day job goes

      Delete
  16. Many authors are exploring self-publishing as well as being hybrid authors who both self-publish and submit to traditional publishers.

    I've quit on people who waste my time and spending after hours on the day job. I maximize my time at the day job and only bring some of it home. I also pretty much quit on TV six years ago. It was no longer interesting and I made more time for my writing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's the kind of quitting I think she was talking about. By calling it quitting, I think she was being provocative since that can be a trigger word for writers. But I think she was really telling us to look at it priorities.

      Delete
  17. I'm working on hiring myself. I like that concept. And I LOVED Natalie's letter.

    ReplyDelete
  18. I need to read both pots, but I have to admit that with age come 'some' wisdom. I have finally learned to admit and embrace my limitations and quit the people, places, and things that are not making me happy.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's one of the few good things that come with all our years. ;)

      Delete
  19. I quit on a few wips in the past that weren't working. It was kind of painful. Self-publishing is still judged but it is better than ten years ago.

    ReplyDelete
  20. Hmm...quitting never sounded so good. This year, I'm trying to quit the habit of going days, weeks and months without writing. Thanks for sharing these links, Donna.

    ReplyDelete
  21. I love this, the way she describes surrounding yourself by successful people, because they are expert quitters, I love that! Thanks for sharing!

    ReplyDelete

Comments brighten my day.

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...